Constant fouling/fast eating

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  • #64472
    holltess4
    Member

    Hello, I don’t know if anyone can help, I have 2 rough collies aged 6 and 7. In July Tess was given steroids for an eye complaint, since then she has become a gannet!  she is eating out the bowl before it has hit the ground and eats it so quick she can’t possibly taste it!  Now we are getting up in the morning or even walking into the kitchen during the day find faceas and sometimes urine in the middle of the kitchen floor!  I’ve been to vets – we’ve assumed the issue is with Tess its a bit difficult when have 2 and cant separate them – but Holly usually always (if she has an accident) goes near the door.  Vet charged £127 for blood tests and urine samplie, and just wants to know how much she drinks, but all come back clear. We’ve ordered some ‘slow feed bowls’ in the hope they’ll help with the feeding issue but anyone any idea on the fouling? :help:

    #88201
    Val
    Member

    Oh my yet another vet making money, Steroids make dogs eat.
    This is a breed close to my heart there are a few members on here with the breed I owned them for many years
    The first thing I would want to know is what is the eye problem and why steroids?
    Let me know and we can take it from there
    Have you any pictures of your two as members will ask they like too Ow and Ar over dogs
    I can definatly point you in the right direction with some more information your girlies problem is down to steriods this is and always has been a very clean breed especially the girlies
    Val

    #88202
    holltess4
    Member

    Hello Val, I remember you from years ago!  when i first got the collies we had a ‘red nose problem’ and you replied to that one!  I havent been on in a while! 
    As I say I’m not 100% positive it is Tess making the mess (hey I rhyme!) it could be Holly but we all have a feeling its more Tess. 
    The white of her eye seemed to spread over half her pupil and we thought it was an infection, we thought it odd cos the vet said it was neorological not an infection and that the steroids should help but if they hadnt within a week to stop them and let it sort on its own –  so why did we need to try the steroids in the first place!.  I actually stopped the steroids after 4 days because she was turning into a gannet and constantly drinking.  The eye improved itself in a few weeks.
    The vet has charged so far £127 just for blood tests which have shown nothing.  He said to take Holly in for them too but to be honest I feel I’m just wasting my money!


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    #88203
    Val
    Member

    I remember the pink nose LOL
    So I would put money on this being Tess first if you get an eye problem in a dog do not go to the vet go to a specialist ophthalmologist.
    Ophthalmologists utilize a retinoscope to examine the red reflex from the eye and an ophthalmoscope to directly visualize the interior of the eye. Dilating eye drops are generally used to enlarge the pupil which enables a more thorough examination which I believe is what you need.

    This is not the sort of equipment your vet would have, neither does he have the expertise unless he has studied eyes as a separate set of exams if he/she is qualified he will have CertVOphthal  after his veterinary title which I very much doubt he has  as it’s another three or fours years of study.
    If I was you I would take her to see a  Ophthalmologist he/she can tell you if this is eye or neurological.

    Steroids have there place in medicine but this is a bit of a punt in the dark as he had no idea if this is eye (There are many things to make a pupil white) or a  neuro problem.Steroids have there place in medicine but this is a bit of a bunt in the dark as he had no idea if this is eye (There are many things to make a pupil white) or a neuro problem if neuro I would of expected other symptoms  

    In collies it’s more likely to be an eye problem best get it sorted before it becomes a bigger problem.
    Are you girls from eye tested stock?
    Val

    #88204
    *Lassie*
    Member

    pretty girlies :-*
    Can’t help with the problem sorry but Val has forgotten more than I will ever know about the breed so you are in good hands.
    Hope it’s all sorted soon, my girl HATES being dirty, so much so she won’t come in the house if she has soiled herself.

    #88205
    holltess4
    Member

    The eye is back to normal, it was back to normal within 3 weeks and doesnt seem to be an issue at all. It is only the fouling and gobbling of food which is the worry now. If the issue with the eye returns though I will heed your advice and take her straight to the opthamologist! Thanx so much for helping, and Lassie your dogs are stunning!

    #88206
    Val
    Member

    OK if the eye is OK on to the gut, there are very few dogs that are naturally dirty and in my knowledge unheard of in Roughs they are picky picky picky.
    First back to the steroids I do wish folks would ask questions of thier vet and not to think they are gods.

    Like antibiotics, steroids are one of the most abused class of drugs in the orthodox veterinarian field of medicine. At one time, they were reserved for the extreme emergency cases. Today, they are being used on the most trivial of conditions. Why? They give the appearance of an instant miracle cure which matches the >expectation= level of the client. So, many vets turn to steroids as the first, rather than the last, line of attack for their anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effects.

    Steroids mimic the action of the adrenal glands, the body’s most powerful regulator of general metabolism. Far from being a wonder drug A cure all steroids cannot cure one single condition. All they do is suppress the body’s ability to express a normal response. Occasionally this type of suppression will give the body a chance to heal itself. But more often, the effect is immediate, devastating and can cause permanent damage as she had them last July one would like to think the affects have worn off.

    So I would suggest a very bland diet including potatos woofing food down is a classic sign of steroids
    Val

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