some help

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  • #62562
    Gracie
    Member

    we looking for a puppy…

    we saw on a website where there are puppies due in jan and jul, that an 8 wk old is to be rehomed due to childs allergies, fair enough, it was taken home last fri, and the person was meant to bring the dog back to the breeder but hasnt (well if child allergies bad enough th get rid would you not asap) this person doesnt have a car!? but lives abou 3 hours north of us and the breeder is 2 hours south of us?! ok so maybe they got the train…but can they not get the train back.

    we called the breeder as the ‘owners’ (think it was the num to contact re this pup anyway) phone was turned off. breeder said that they will prob want the full price (ok fair enough as its still very young at 8 weeks) the breeder never asked anything about us (whenever we have rang other places they tend to ask lots of questions..

    But this is I gues the point to my post, A would that dog be a good bet? at 8 weeks – it cant have developped many / any probs really?! and B WHY do people / breeders want to sell dogs on, that are much older than 8 weeks ie we looked into one who was 8 / 9 months and they wanted full price!!
    would you not write into your contract that you must bring the dog back and you will not get a refund!! I wouldnt mind paying money if it was say going to rescue but for the breed to get paid twice for the same dog!!

    sorry bit of a rant!

    and how do i know who is a good breeder and who is not!?!

    #110367
    Anonymous
    Guest

    Think I’d steer well clear to be honest.
    What sort of pup are you looking for, another weimie?

    #110368
    Gracie
    Member

    Vizsla  🙂 We contacted V resuce ages ago but after offering one dog which was unsuitable never heard from them again, so we looking for a puppy!

    #110369
    .dodger.
    Member

    i would stay away too.

    i guess the best way to find a good breeder is to make sure the dogs they use for breeding all have the relevant health checks, go and visit them to see what condition the dogs are in and live in (outside/inside) ect make sure you ask about how they raise a litter (so inside/outside, what food, what age do they go to their new homes at) Do you want a show, work or pet bred one? I think a good breeder will always ask about yourself and your lifestyle :yes:

    #110370
    Anonymous
    Guest
    #110371

    Think id be inclined to stay clear – as for good breeders, pop up some possibles on here and no doubt everyone can sort the good from the bad  :ok:

    #110372
    .dodger.
    Member

    [quote author=jaydex link=topic=13011.msg250719#msg250719 date=1226262617]
    http://www.siriusbell.co.uk/
    [/quote]
    they have nice looking dogs but not to keen on the epupz link on their webby :-\

    #110373
    Anonymous
    Guest

    didnt notice that, but there are some good breeders on there aswell.

    #110374
    .dodger.
    Member

    what health checks do Vizsal’s have done? ???

    #110375
    Gracie
    Member

    [quote author=jaydex link=topic=13011.msg250719#msg250719 date=1226262617]
    http://www.siriusbell.co.uk/
    [/quote]

    hmmm breeders we called have just studded their dog out to them! but i guess that doesnt particually mean anything!

    the owner has now just rang, asking what we want to know about the dog and has the breeder said that we can have him – asked where we lived.. but if i did i think i would want to go meet breeder and parents etc….

    and good question Laura and one i should have thought of! i guess HD 

    #110376
    Izzie
    Member

    Found this Gracie.

    There are various health issues in dogs of all breeds that cause concern for their breeders and owners. For some illnesses and conditions, there are steps that can be taken to prevent the possibility of the illness or a condition arising, e.g., through vaccination, X-rays and suchlike. Other conditions that exist are less well-known and are being investigated to establish the extent of the condition and the best treatment for it.

    This section of the HVC website attempts to acquaint Vizsla breeders, owners and potential owners with some current worrying conditions. Please, click on the condition to read about it.

    FACT SHEET ABOUT MYOSITIS (muscle inflammation)

    Click here to download Myositis Fact Sheet in Word format

    Generally the vizsla has always been considered to be a healthy breed. Responsible breeders adhere to a code of conduct which requires that they breed only from vizslas that are of sound temperament, hip-scored, physically healthy and free from known hereditary diseases.

    This approach has always worked very well indeed and it has helped to ensure that a vizsla usually lives a long, strong, happy and healthy life.

    From about 2004 onwards observers began to note that a number of young vizslas were succumbing to a swallowing disorder which had not previously been clinically recognised. “Myositis and Dysphagia in Hungarian Vizslas” is now the subject of a veterinary research project

    The condition is still very uncommon (and your puppy is MOST unlikely to be a victim) but, for the purposes of the research project, responsible breeders are now including this fact sheet in their puppy packs so that new owners can be made aware of what to look out for (the disease is so unusual that many local vets may not recognise it either!)

    The signs of our illness are problems with swallowing – both food and water – excessive drooling, and usually also muscle wasting around the head. Typical onset is usually in adolescence or maybe up to about two years of age and frequently there is an acute episode of retching, gagging, choking, dysphagia and hypersalivation. Sometimes the onset is more insidious with inefficient and messy eating and drinking being noted. Often there is an initial diagnosis of megaoesophagus. Fatigue, aspiration pneumonia and a stiffness of gait are other common findings. The illness is believed to be immune mediated. With prompt diagnosis and treatment it can usually be well controlled.

    The disease is more fully described on this website http://www.vizslamyositis.blogspot.com/

    Once again we emphasise that as responsible breeders we care about the future health and well-being of our lovely breed. We are including this fact sheet for information purposes only and do not want you to worry unnecessarily. Please keep this sheet and if over the months and years to come you hear of any vizsla that has succumbed to myositis, or other immune mediated illness, then please ask the owner to contact those in the breed who are conducting the research.

    Authored in March 2008 by Di Addicott 01576 202258 [email protected]

    Future health issues are likely to be
    Hip & Elbow Dysplasia.
    Epilepsy.
    Infertility.
    Auto-immune Deficiency.
    Eye Conditions.

    #110377
    Gracie
    Member

    thanks for that Izzie  🙂

    #110378
    Izzie
    Member

    You’re welcome

    As long as we get lots of puppy pics when you do bring home the next one!  😉 ;D ;D

    #110379
    Sweetypye
    Member

    I would find out if the breeder belonged to a breed club as they have their own codes of ethics to which members must adhere and ring the secretary to see if they knew of them.

    I would also ensure that both sire and dam had been health screened for the relevant diseases for which they are known, if not I would steer well clear.

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